Comes from THIS article....

Graphic comes from THIS article...what a coincidence!

I had my genome sequenced primarily for health reasons in late 2013.
Not only did I get some great information that confirmed what I already knew and informed me of my relative risks for other health conditions, based on my own genetic ancestry, I learned that I am 44% Ashkenazi, an important category of people who are prone to medical oddities and have been studied in-depth for this reason. (This proves that you can’t believe everything Mom tells you sometimes..I was supposedly Italian and Scottish/English. Whoops.)

I chose to have my testing done by 23andme, primarily because of their reputation, their ongoing independent research into many genetic issues, and the fact that they will continue to update your results for ten (10) years based upon any research. There were many choices available and many levels of cost. It is very disheartening to have had the FDA suspend the medical genetic testing portion of their operation for what I personally believe to be political and capitalistic – they are not getting any money from the testing, nor is any income being generated for the FDA’s strongest lobbying groups. But, I do not wish to discuss the politics of the FDA here. Unaligned DNA sequences

Using my genetic raw data, I used several online services to re-analyze the results I had received from 23andme. Many of these databases address or define particular issues that 23andme chooses not to tell their customers. Perhaps this is due to space limitations, or the mere fact they don’t want to overwhelm lay persons with information that may not make much sense to them. I found that Promethease was the most comprehensive analysis tool available. (If you choose NOT to download the analysis tool, the reports (yes plural) will cost you $5. I downloaded the program so I did not have to pay for my information).

If you are a regular reader of my blog, you know that I have a lot of uncommon conditions, and that I have been misdiagnosed and/or dismissed by MANy physicians over the past 30 years. I have had all sorts of strange and “rarely reported” side effects to many medications. Now, thanks to 23andme and Promethease, and my subsequent research (jump-started by the links in the Promethease report), I now know WHY.

So, WHY?

My results show a multitude of genetic mutations in one of the genes known as the “multi-drug resistance”  (MDR) genes –  ABCB1 (“a gene that is the member of the superfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. ABC proteins transport various molecules across extra- and intra-cellular membranes. ABC genes are divided into seven distinct subfamilies (ABC1, MDR/TAP, MRP, ALD, OABP, GCN20, White). This protein is a member of the MDR/TAP subfamily. Members of the MDR/TAP subfamily are involved in multi-drug resistance. The protein encoded by this gene is an ATP-dependent drug efflux pump for xenobiotic compounds with broad substrate specificity. It is responsible for decreased drug accumulation in multidrug-resistant cells and often mediates the development of resistance to anticancer drugs. This protein also functions as a transporter in the blood-brain barrier.”   http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/gene/ABCB1.)

This information coincides with the strange side effects and non-response issues I have had for decades with certain drugs. It is welcome confirmation that something is DEFINITELY different about me…it is vindication….documentary evidence…and proof of my own hypothesis (bolstered by the occasional physician) that “something wasn’t right with me” since I was 12 yrs old.  Even better and more important – it is based on HARD science – using my own genome!!! Not just supposition based on some papers or articles I heard about on Dr. Oz or WebMD, or anecdotal ramblings I try to get my doctors to “hear.”

I recently had a serious adverse drug event that could have been prevented had I known about my ABCB1 mutations before I started the medication. When I informed my doctor, the response I received was a copy of a 3 yr old opinion paper written by a “for doctors-only” research service dismissing most genetic testing by commercial entities as inaccurate and unreliable – despite the fact that these companies use the EXACT SAME proprietary, science-industry-produced tools and assays as any hospital, medical lab or university researcher would use. The article referred to genetic testing initiated by patients as part of the “personalized medicine” fad and gave strong advice to their target audience NOT to rely on any of the results. (Unfortunately, I do not have access to the service that publishes the article, therefore I cannot give you a link to it. However, if you contact me, I can provide you with a PDF.)

While I agree that testing in the PAST was if-fy, based on which lab was utilized, I vehemently disagree with this article’s continued dissemination to physicians based simply on the harm that it could cause to patients.

MDR mutations have HUGE implications in drug metabolism. If drugs that do not cross tissue barriers due to the lack of proteins in a person’s body that are supposed to carry drugs across membranes which they need to cross to work, they can accumulate in organs and body tissues and cause problems. I’ve had that happen.

Since I received the 2011 article from my doctor putting-down of “personalized testing platforms” such as 23andme, I have done some research and found MANY online resources that re-analyze the results of the 23andme testing (or DNA raw data from anywhere) are now available on the internet. I imagine this was in response to the persistent questioning of results by healthcare professionals.

Also, it should be noted that as inferred in the anti- personalized medicine article, 23andme doesn’t use their own geneotyping materials, but in fact uses commercially available arrays – just like the “real doctors” use! They state this clearly in their response to the FDA’s accusations about a month ago. I count at no less, 25 commercially available microarray cards that are manufactured for the purpose of determine multi-drug resistance available (just an example from ONE company), then it must be a lot more standardized than the author of the article is aware.

So, why did I mention DOGS in the title of his post?

Check out the link from this pic!

Check out the link for this pic! You can’t escape the uses of DNA!!

Turns out that MDR testing for purebreds is a common thing, as is evidenced by the multitude of tests available  – this is one company offers MANY. Just Google “canine ABCB1 testing” for a plethora of research articles on canine testing, and companies that specialize in such testing. (Perhaps I should go see a vet….)

I now fear seeing any more specialists here in Boston, where microspecialites seem to be norm at these training hospitals. I fear seeing a “personalized medicine” hater, or someone who despises people like me – ePatients that have the knowledge and ability to research issues on our own, similar to a certain specialist I saw last year that was agitated that I had possession of my test reports and medical information. Gee, if he know I had my genome sequenced and had all this information about my DNA – he would blow a gasket!!

So, why don’t I see a geneticist, you may be wondering…My insurance company will not pay for me to see a general geneticist – a cancer geneticist – yes – in fact, “strongly recommended” for people with my breast cancer family history; or, a cardiac geneticist – sure, no problem! The insurance company’s policy conveys that it doesn’t think that any other genetic abnormalities are important enough to explore to improve or save their patients’ lives, or even save them money in finding a treatment for their disorders.

A multitude of papers address this topic (not “personalized medicine” – but ABCB1 and other P-gp mutations) – in detail – be it for cancer drugs or antidepressants. Most often, it is applied in cancer cases, as certain cancers show affinity/resistance for one drug or another, based on P-gp status.

The man who wrote the most cited paper regarding the specific SNPs responsible for genetic-based responsiveness to several different antidepressants is Manfred Ur, MD at the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry. He has been researching and documenting these polymorphisms in well-respected peer-reviewed journals since 2000. His webpage is a great place to start your research.

Here are a few of the most informative research papers I have found on the topic of ABCB1 mutations. Don’t forget to check out the references at the end of the article – they are a treasure-trove of additional information, and may lead you to exactly what you are looking for, if the referencing paper didn’t hit home for you.

ABCB1 – Genetics Home Reference

Great Tutorials about Pharamcogenomics

Polymorphisms in the Drug Transporter Gene Predicts Antidepressant Response

The ABCB1 Gene and Antidepressant Response

Ethnicity-related Polymorphisms and the ABCB1 Gene

Pharmacogenetics of Antidepressant Response – An Update

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Comments
  1. Woah! There’s so much in that post! How awesome that you got the testing done, how rubbish that your doctor won’t give it any credence, what fascinating information to have your hands on!

    • Lori says:

      Thanks for your comment!! My PCP is very skeptical b/c “she’s not heard of such testing.” I often wonder how docs can NOT hear about stuff that ePatients like us seem to stubble upon ALL the time…how is it possible that people in the profession know nothing about these things???

    • Lori says:

      And it’s not getting any easier. Even the docs that hold themselves out to be researchers in the field of pharmacogenomics refuse to return my PCP’s attempts to contact them. (And they Chaim to be taking new patients…
      How rude!!!

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